Tag Archives: orange

End band net-wing beetle (Calopteron terminale)

This week I finally decided to teach myself how to identify Calopteron terminale (end band net-wing beetle), and the characteristics aren’t as bad as I thought. I made a visual to help in case others might find it useful:

Identifying End band net-wing (Calopteron terminale)

The easiest diagnostic feature is the transverse depression (dip), shown with a red line in photograph above. I think when I first noticed this depression in the wild I foolishly assumed it was a deformation that certain beetles got from being wedged into a pupal cases that were a tad too small for their bellies. But no, it’s a real, unique thing for this species. And no, I have know idea why they have it.

Below is another of my C. terminale photographs. In this one you can see that there’s a second, slight depression just anterior to the transverse band. For this reason many keys refer to an “undulation” along elytra rather than just a single depression. Here is one on Instagram that really shows the undulation. But sometimes the anterior one is hard to see.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; End band net-wing (Calopteron terminale)

Even the distal depression is sometimes hard to see with dorsal photographs, so in those cases use the uniformity in discal costae (ridge, vein) heights to make the ID. Excluding the edge vein there are four (4) ridges that are “elevated” to the same amount. Both C. reticulatum and C. discrepans (the other two members of the genus in the United States) have alternating ridge heights. The ridges are filled with poisonous hemolymph, by the way, so don’t poke them.

In addition to the above diagnostic features, many keys say that C. terminale has a “distinct blue tinge”. Other species in the genus sometimes have a blue tinge but I’ve only noticed a distinct blue tinge on C. terminale. 

For more information on identification, here are links to C. terminaleC. reticulatum and C. discrepans on BugGuide. If you’re on iNaturalist, here they are again: C. terminaleC. reticulatum and C. discrepansThere are many more (100+) species in the genus, and most of them are in South America, Central America, and Mexico. I’m not aware of a current guide to these other species but here’s an 1886 one for Central America.

If you encounter a mating pile of any of these insects, please take a lot of photographs and examine the abdomens of females for droplets of hemolymph. There are reports (Burke 1976) that males feed on this hemolymph. So if you get a good pic, send me a URL of the image so I can link to you.

For more natural history, start with these publications:

Burke, H.R. 1976. Observations on the adult behavior of the Lycid beetle Calopteron terminale (Coleoptera: Lycidae). Entomological News 87:229-232. 

McCabe, T.L., and L.M. Johnson. 1979. Larva of Calopteron terminale (Say) with additional notes on adult behavior (Coleoptera: Lycidae). Journal of the New York Entomological Society 87:283-288.

Sycamore tussock moth

Sycamore tussock moth (Halysidota harrisii) caterpillar at Hildacy Farm Preserve in Media, PA. I remember these as a child mainly because of their urticating hairs. But they are also really, really cute. I especially like the white ones because their orange tufts stand out better than on the yellow variety. Don’t you just want to pick it up?? If by chance you don’t know what “urticating” means, I highly recommend the experience. You won’t forget.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Sycamore tussock moth caterpillar (Halysidota harrisii)

Golden-backed snipe fly

This golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus) landed in one of my bird baths and drifted around for a few minutes on the surface tension. I’m not positive, but I think I’ve seen them do this in past years, too. I wonder whether they are looking for mosquito larvae, or perhaps adults. These flies have predaceous mouthparts, so they clearly hunt something. Sure wish somebody would PCR the gut contents of these things and let me know. Anyone ever seen them take something down?

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus)

Here’s another one, albeit one with a damaged eye:

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus) with dented eye