Category Archives: Photography

Cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg masses

UPDATED: After some more digging, I think they are just Pseudococcidae, which is what Lucy Dinsmore thought they were initially. So they are not braconids, sadly, and thus will not be any help for controlling spotted lanternfllies. Sorry to get your hopes up.

If you see an egg mass, nymph, or adult that is parasitized by wasps or infected by fungi, report it immediately — ideally to both iNaturalist and to your local extension agent — AND collect it in case somebody wants it. And tell me about it, too, please.

Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly eggs

Photographs of cryptic spotted lanternfly egg masses

After I posted this photograph of spotted lanternfly egg masses on Twitter, several people asked me to point out where, exactly, the masses were. I did, but I also thought I’d add these images to my website in case people would like to use them in presentations (to help people prepare for the arrival of the pest in more states). I’ll highlight the egg locations below, but first try to find them. Click on the photograph to view a larger version.

Cryptic spotted lanternfly egg masses on river birch

Here is an image that shows the locations.

Cryptic spotted lanternfly egg masses on river birch

These photographs were taken on February 28, 2020, at the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill, PA. The river birches in the area had hundreds if not thousands of egg masses.

Spotted lanternflies tend to oviposit on any smooth surface, including man-made objects like buildings, shipping containers, cars, trains, shovels, etc.). They also have the annoying habit of laying egg masses underneath loose bark. There are, sadly, so many ways the insect is annoying.

More photographs of spotted lanternflies on my flickr account. Please also see my post, “Spotted lanternfly control tips“, for details on how to kill eggs, nymphs, and adults.

Cribraria aurantiaca

Just a short update about that mysterious green slime mold I posted about in 2017. It’s Cribraria aurantiaca. Huge thanks to Sarah Lloyd (author of Where the Slime Mould Creeps) for the identification on iNaturalist.

I’ve revisited the log perhaps 10 times over the past three years but I’ve failed to find the sporangia, which are yellow when fresh. I’ll keep trying. To me, the plasmodium looks just like oobleck, the green slime featured in the Dr Seuss book, Bartholomew and the Oobleck.

Cribraria aurantiaca growing under the bark of a decaying pine tree

More photographs on my flickr account.

If you like slime molds and have an Instagram account, follow Sarah Lloyd. She also has a website.