Tag Archives: poster session

Conference poster full of tips for creating conference posters

In case you need a quick guide to making a conference poster, here are two versions of my poster of poster tips. They have content overlap, so just choose the layout that pleases you. More details below the images.

Poster example (Colin Purrington's)Advice on designing scientific posters

Both posters are descendants of a document I created circa 1997 for my evolution students at Swarthmore College. The bottom one is available as a PDF if you want to print an actual poster of it — which I highly recommend if you are assigning a poster project for your class (students don’t like reading the website, below).

My full tips are at “Designing conference posters“. I created the website for my students, too, but eventually made it public in case it might help make the world’s poster sessions more enjoyable and their posters easier to understand. Please share with your friends.

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Boxes of bling for scientific posters

I saw these poster add-ons at a local office supply store and just had to take a photograph. If you want to see my suggestions on better ways of blinging up a conference poster, please see “Adding pieces of flair” on my poster tips page. If you don’t get my silly “pieces of flair” reference, please watch this clip from the movie, Office Space. Actually, just rent the movie: it’s all good.

Colin Purrington Photography: Scientific posters &emdash; Sparkles and lights for posters

 

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Fabric conference posters

I was invited to talk about poster design in Berkeley (DOE NNSA SSGF) and DC (DOE CSGF) this past summer, and used the opportunity to test out fabric as a medium for large-format conference posters. Below are some photographs if you’re curious how logos, illustrations, and photographs look when viewed close up on fabric. By the way, I ordered the posters from PhD Posters (they mailed to my house in a tube, inside a box). And if you’re interested, my poster design tips are here (rather long-winded because I’ve maintained page since 1997).

fabric-posters

The rolled up poster above is also fabric. I didn’t have the nerve to fold it into luggage-sized square, but I’ve heard that it can be done … though crease lines an issue. Might be able to iron them out, I’ve also read.

photograph-on-fabric-poster-I

The photograph above isn’t as crisp as a glossy poster, but was totally fine for my purposes. If it really mattered, I’d just print a copy on my photo printer at 1200 dpi (or whatever) and then use double sided tape to attach. Even paper posters have fairly low photo quality, so attaching a high-resolution version is always an option when you need it.

photograph-on-fabric-poster-III

Yes, you can see the fabric if you get close enough. People standing 6 feet away wouldn’t notice and probably wouldn’t care if you told them.

illustration-on-fabric-poster-I

illustration-on-fabric-poster-II

graph-on-fabric-poster

logo-on-fabric-poster

This logo is actually from the poster that is rolled up. It’s at http://colinpurrington.com/2012/example-of-bad-scientific-poster/ if you want to see the whole poster (you can download and print for your class, if you’d like; yeah, students would just love that).

fabric-poster-edge-detailThis photograph shows how the edges can get a little frayed. Holes from pushpins are also visible. Much less annoying than the rips and gaping holes that paper gets.

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Poster judging form

I’ve had several people ask me recently for a copy of my poster judging form, so just in case you were afraid to ask, here it is. The idea is to use tick-boxes (1 to 10 — “atrocious” to “wonderful”) to quickly record your thoughts on poster design, poster content, and oral presentation.  Click on the image to download a PDF if you’d like to use it.  If you ever need it in the future, the most recent version (the one below is a draft) will be near the bottom of my Designing Conference Posters page, in the “Plea to all-powerful meeting organizers” section.

Poster juding form

 

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Help me defeat the powerful El Guapo

One of the many great scenes in ¡Three Amigos! is the impassioned speech about rising up against the obstacles that all of us face in life. It’s a speech everyone should commit to memory. I like it so much I have the mp3 on my running playlist (right after Moby’s “Extreme Ways”), and my extended family watches the movie every Christmas eve, per tradition. I also play the clip whenever I lecture on how to confront Creationism in science classrooms (it applies, trust me). The movie clip is below, but if it doesn’t play on your device, here’s the sound clip and text. So watch it, and then continue reading below, where I explain why I need help and why you should give it to me.

My personal El Guapo right now is The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research (CPBR, to those in the biotech world). If you read my previous post, you know that they have demanded that I permanently delete my 15-page guide to making scientific posters for meetings (“Designing conference posters“), or else face litigation and hundreds of thousands of dollars in fees and such. This ultimatum was delivered via Certified Mail from Arnold & Porter, a prestigious law firm. This demand came only after I pointed out that CPBR’s “Call for preproposals” contains 2 1/2 pages of text lifted from my website. If you want to see it, there is a version here (though probably not for long). These 2 1/2 pages not only fail to mention that I am the author, they contain “Copyright The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc.” at the bottom. So, essentially, they have hired one of the most expensive law firms in the world to bully me into giving them the rights to my intellectual property. Some have argued that anything written about scientific posters is boring and not worthy of copyright, but I have been working on the content since 1997 and I rather like it: I have crafted it be a tad irreverent in the hopes that undergraduates might actually read it. So, naturally, I have absolutely no intention of giving my text to CPBR. And I have no intention of letting them get away with the bullying.

This is where you come in. Or could come in, if you want. My personal El Guapo has a budget in the hundreds of millions of dollars, and they apparently have every intention of pursuing litigation. So even though they plagiarized from me, they could ultimately get my site taken down if I run out of money before they do, a likely outcome of the litigation. So how can I defeat El Guapo? I can sew! Actually, that’s true (I own two sewing machines), but that’s not going to help me in this situation, regrettably. The only thing I can do is use this darn blog to defeat them. That’s where you come in. What I’d really appreciate is for people with influence to help advertise this situation so that CPBR feels the scrutiny of taxpayers, and, by extension, the scrutiny of politicians who give CPBR its millions in yearly allocations. That’s right: CPBR is using some of those funds to hire expensive lawyers to file fraudulent copyright infringement claims. If you pay taxes on April 15, you should be outraged. So if you can Tweet this post to your followers, my situation might eventually get known by those in D.C. who vote on such distributions of government funds. And if you don’t Tweet or Facebook, but know important people, please consider calling them. And then email me so that I can properly thank you.

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