Fabric conference posters

I was invited to talk about poster design in Berkeley (DOE NNSA SSGF) and DC (DOE CSGF) this past summer, and used the opportunity to test out fabric as a medium for large-format conference posters. Below are some photographs if you’re curious how logos, illustrations, and photographs look when viewed close up on fabric. By the way, I ordered the posters from PhD Posters (they mailed to my house in a tube, inside a box). And if you’re interested, my poster design tips are here (rather long-winded because I’ve maintained page since 1997).

fabric-posters

The rolled up poster above is also fabric. I didn’t have the nerve to fold it into luggage-sized square, but I’ve heard that it can be done … though crease lines an issue. Might be able to iron them out, I’ve also read.

photograph-on-fabric-poster-I

The photograph above isn’t as crisp as a glossy poster, but was totally fine for my purposes. If it really mattered, I’d just print a copy on my photo printer at 1200 dpi (or whatever) and then use double sided tape to attach. Even paper posters have fairly low photo quality, so attaching a high-resolution version is always an option when you need it.

photograph-on-fabric-poster-III

Yes, you can see the fabric if you get close enough. People standing 6 feet away wouldn’t notice and probably wouldn’t care if you told them.

illustration-on-fabric-poster-I

illustration-on-fabric-poster-II

graph-on-fabric-poster

logo-on-fabric-poster

This logo is actually from the poster that is rolled up. It’s at http://colinpurrington.com/2012/example-of-bad-scientific-poster/ if you want to see the whole poster (you can download and print for your class, if you’d like; yeah, students would just love that).

fabric-poster-edge-detailThis photograph shows how the edges can get a little frayed. Holes from pushpins are also visible. Much less annoying than the rips and gaping holes that paper gets.

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Ebola evolution

Just a Public Service Announcement from Charles Darwin: get a flu shot now so that you’ll (likely) be alive to fret endlessly about Ebola.

Charles Darwin on Ebola evolution

And if you don’t get the vaccine and end up getting the flu, please consider quarantining yourself: you are infectious because flu is airborne and kills a lot of us (36,000+). From the CDC:

“Most healthy adults may be able to infect other people beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Children may pass the virus for longer than 7 days. Symptoms start 1 to 4 days after the virus enters the body. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Some people can be infected with the flu virus but have no symptoms. During this time, those persons may still spread the virus to others.”

(Charles Darwin painted by Carl Buell. Background mural by Borgny Bay. Photo by me.)

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WHYY pledge buttons

I’ve already pledged, but wondered whether my friends at WHYY might need some printable “I pledged” buttons. So many people are closet pledgers, I suspect, so showing a little love in public places might be another way to get the word out during pledge week(s). If you’re a public radio fan in the listening area, give it a try. Here’s the PDF. (And here’s how to become a member.)

WHYY-pledged-buttons

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Hardy kiwis

I’ve had to wait over 10 years, but my female kiwi finally set fruit in 2014 after probably 12 years. The fruit are tiny — about the size of a big grape — but wonderfully delicious.

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-1

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-2

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-3

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Poster of drugs that kill things (Ebola version)

Because the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital recently sent an Ebola patient home with antibacterials, I decided to update my guide to pills that kill things: I added Ebola to list of sample viruses. Some viruses can sometimes be killed with antivirals (e.g., zanamivir, oseltamivir), but viruses cannot be killed with antibacterials (e.g., azithromycin, amoxicillin). Here’s the PDF in case you want a large version to hang up in the Emergency Room lobby. I know there’s a fad of only posting information that is understandable to second graders, but I think there are some patients who would appreciate the guide. Please share with the health practitioner in your family.

guide to anti-infective drugs

As you may notice, I’ve chosen to use the word “antibacterial” instead of “antibiotic” to refer to drugs that are antibacterial. The reason is that many people ask for “antibiotics” even when they know they have a viral disease — the word suggests to many that the drug should be effective against anything biotic (bacteria, fungi, etc.). “Antibiotic” initially had  that broader meaning, and Google and many other sites retain such a definition … hence the public’s persistent misunderstanding. The graphic above demonstrates that the word “antibacterial” is completely satisfactory as a drug label. Reducing confusion will reduce the number of patients demanding, and getting, antibacterials when they don’t really need them.

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