Tag Archives: introduced

Cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg masses

UPDATED: After some more digging, I think they are just Pseudococcidae, which is what Lucy Dinsmore thought they were initially. So they are not braconids, sadly, and thus will not be any help for controlling spotted lanternfllies. Sorry to get your hopes up.

If you see an egg mass, nymph, or adult that is parasitized by wasps or infected by fungi, report it immediately — ideally to both iNaturalist and to your local extension agent — AND collect it in case somebody wants it. And tell me about it, too, please.

Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly egg mass
Braconid cocoons on spotted lanternfly eggs

Spotted lanternfly photographs

I’ve posted a few pics of the invasive spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) on Instagram but thought I’d feature my full collection in a post. The insect is extremely photogenic but it’s also good to let people know what different stages look like so that everyone can kill them. I still need some early-instar pics as well as some showing spotted lanternflies being consumed by parasites and fungi.

Adult showing colorful underwings. Presumably to advertise toxicity to predators. Binky Lee Preserve, Chester Springs, PA.
Gravid female. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge, Tinicum, PA.
Egg mass on a tree. The surface is a waxy substance that covers several rows of eggs. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge, Tinicum, PA.
Third-instar nymph. Goshen Trail, Newtown Square, PA.
Three adults on a tree. Trees can have thousands. Binky Lee Preserve, Chester Springs, PA.
Sap oozing from feeding site wound. Ailanthus tree. Rose Tree Park, Media, PA.
Slick at base of Ailanthus tree caused by dripping honeydew (sugary excrement). Rose Tree Park, Media, PA.
Adult caught in spider web. Hildacy Preserve, Media, PA.

Below is a map showing the distribution of spotted lanternflies in North America as of October 3rd, 2019. Here’s a current map. To add a sighting, please sign up for iNaturalist (free) and post a photograph.

Here’s what the distribution is likely to be in the future (per Wakie et al. 2019):

Greenhouse camel crickets (Tachycines asynamorus)

Here are some photographs of greenhouse camel crickets (Tachycines asynamorus) that I recently found in and around my house. It’s called the greenhouse camel cricket because when it (and related T. japanica) first came to Europe from Asia it was a common insect in conservatories. I’m not positive, but I think before that invasion the name “camel cricket” was more commonly applied to the praying mantis (mantids have long necks just like camels).

Note that the Latin name for this species used to be Diestrammena asynamora. Full details are in Qin et al. 2018. Nobody seems to use the new name except iNaturalist. But I use iNaturalist a lot so I’m going to give the new name a try.

Juvenile greenhouse camel cricket (Tachycines asynamorus) in bathroom sink

This is a juvenile that I found in my bathroom sink. I think they go through 10 instars and I’m guessing this is a 3rd instar male (lacks an ovipositor). It was pretty cute.

Female greenhouse camel cricket (Tachycines asynamorus) in cat litter

Camel crickets love to eat cat feces (don’t judge) so it’s pretty common to find them lurking here, sometimes in large groups. I don’t think the females lay eggs in cat litter but I’ve always been curious. Not curious enough to examine more closely, though.

Female greenhouse camel cricket (Tachycines asynamorus) in cat litter

This is the same individual as above but shows the ovipositor and impressive length of the antennae. The antennae apparently have the ability to sense heat. That’s probably a fact most people don’t want to know.

Female greenhouse camel cricket (Tachycines asynamorus) on stacked firewood

This female was in the woodpile near my garage. It was a cold day so she didn’t immediately launch herself away. They often seem to jump at you, a behavior that doesn’t endear them to folks who think the crickets are actually spiders. I think their jump can max out at 1 1/2 meters, which is pretty impressive. They can’t fly, though, because they lack wings (and are thus silent). Note that placing woodpiles near your house is one way people inadvertently introduce camel crickets into their houses.

Greenhouse camel cricket (Tachycines asynamorus) frass on wall

These three gooey splotches are frass. If you have a large population of camel crickets your wall will become darkened with this spots. I’ve been trying to figure out why they are liquid but haven’t come up with any explanations yet.

If you’re fascinated by greenhouse camel crickets there’s a great article at Your Wild Life that describes how different species are invading the United States. If you just want to kill them I have a few ideas.