Tag Archives: teacher

Vaccinating kids against sugary drink addiction

It’s sometimes hard to notice against the backdrop of large and extra-large adults, but 1 out of 3 kids these days is overweight or obese, too. Consuming drinks that have sugar, which kids really, really love, is a big part of why, especially because some parents think such drinks are healthy. So I got to wondering what public schools are actually doing to educate kids about the calorie content of beverages. Or, for kids too young to really grasp the calorie concept, how do schools inform kids that drinking too many sugary drinks can make them fat (if, indeed, teachers are allowed to suggest that being fat might be unhealthy)? Given that obesity is the most pressing medical issue facing kids, I would think that public schools would be totally focused on these topics, and would acknowledge that early intervention is better.

Below is the class activity I think all kindergartners should be doing: making a poster showing how much sugar is in common beverages. It’s a common science fair project, but if done in early elementary school the experience might vaccinate them against over-consumption of sugary drinks.

Sugar in drinksThere are lots of ways to do it, but what I like about the one above is that water and plain milk are included. There should also be some common juices (apple, orange, e.g.), of course, because they are loaded with sugar. And just for scale, it might be good to show how many teaspoons of sugar are in a typical bag of candy (e.g., Skittles).

I would further suggest that the poster include a bag of sugar to represent the total number of calories needed for a typical kindergartner (maybe 1 1/2 cups; 1200 calories?). Teachers should clarify, of course, that eating 1 1/2 cups of sugar is not the way kids should meet their daily energy needs. When done, the poster can go out in the hallway to horrify the rest of the school.

Finally, don’t give your poster a weak title like, “Rethink your drink.” Although we know what that means (and it rhymes), try instead to craft something with a more direct message, like, “Don’t drink dessert all day”, “Don’t drink your dessert”, “Sugary drinks are candy drinks”, “Liquid candy can make you fat.” The idea is to be direct, memorable. And to not shy away from the point: sugary drinks can (do!) make kids fat.

I’m making a Pinterest board to collect some good examples, so if you are a public school teacher, please have a look:

Pinterest board Educating kindergartners about sugary drinks on Pinterest.

Posted in Biology, Education, Food, Graphic design, Health, Photography, Science | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Adding photo credits to Powerpoint shows

UPDATE: please see this page for updated slides and additional tips.

Here are tips for educators on how to attribute images in a Powerpoint slide deck (hit pause button to assert manual control of the slide advance).  The tips are focused on the logistics of attribution (placement, text color, etc.) since the law aspect is, um, complicated.  It’s just a draft, so if you have suggestions, let me know in comments or via email.  I made it because very, very few educators seem to provide image credits.  Or at least the ones who post their slides online …

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In other news, my other thoughts on Powerpoint.

And, since you’re reading below the fold … any advice on getting WordPress to display Powerpoint slides so that URLs work?  I’ve tried several plug-ins, but nothing seems to work.

Posted in Biology, Education, Graphic design, Photography, Science | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment