Tag Archives: plant

Sweet potato flesh can reduce yam confusion

So I have a silly, futile goal of reducing the confusion over sweet potatoes and yams in the United States. If you are a grocery store manager and are on board with this silly, futile goal, please consider displaying the flesh inside the different sweet potato varieties you sell. Doing that will reduce reliance on the strange habit of calling orange-fleshed sweet potatoes “yams.” You can easily show the insides of your sweet potatoes by chopping one in half and wrapping the cut end in plastic wrap, then placing back into the display shelf — you can even use a Sharpie to write stuff on the plastic (I’ve never seen this done … but I’m sure it would work). Or you can make signage that has a photograph of flesh. If you also add some thoughts on how to use them in cooking, even better. Below are two examples of ‘Nancy Hall’ and ‘Beauregard’ sweet potatoes that I cooked over the weekend.

Labels for sweet potatoesNote that the word “yam” does not appear on the sign. If you are the type that says, “What?? You idiot. That sure looks like a yam to me!” … please have look over my “Yams versus sweet potatoes” page. It probably won’t change your opinion, but you’ll at least know what a yam looks like.

On a side note, my ‘Nancy Hall’ sweet potatoes turned out great. I partially cooked them in the oven (coat with bacon fat first) and then sauteed the diced flesh with butter and hickory bark syrup. I used the ‘Beauregard’ to make biscuits. It turns out that biscuits are good with Chessmen cookie butter. Just saying.

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Hardy kiwis

I’ve had to wait over 10 years, but my female kiwi finally set fruit in 2014 after probably 12 years. The fruit are tiny — about the size of a big grape — but wonderfully delicious.

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-1

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-2

Colin Purrington Photography: plants &emdash; hardy-kiwi-3

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DMCA NOCI RE CPBR PDF

This post is for people tracking the bizarre ethical slide of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR).

As you probably know from my earlier posts, CPBR sends out a yearly invitation to plant biotechnology researchers to submit grant proposals.  Part of the emailed PDF has instructions on how to make a scientific poster, and a big part of that section was created by copying/pasting text from my page on the topic (but with no quotation marks and no attribution).

Because I happen to have an official copyright registration on my poster design page, the PDF is in violation of U.S. copyright law.  So, in addition to being able to sue CPBR rather easily, I can can also use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to send Notifications of Copyright Infringement (NOCIs) to have the CPBR document (PDF and any paper copies) destroyed.

So here’s what I’ve done.

  1. I’ve asked every member university to delete the PDF when received from CPBR.  In other words, the grants administration office will no longer forward that PDF to faculty on campus.  Because CPBR forbids member institutions from posting the PDF online (don’t ask me why), this means CPBR will not receive grant applications in the future.  Note that asking universities to help protect my copyright is a friendly request — I was not accusing the universities of anything.  It’s just like asking them to help protect copyrighted movies that might be illegally shared by students.  With one exception (University of Minnesota), they are happy to help. The University of Minnesota’s lawyers insist email forwarding of PDFs is exempt from copyright law (lingering effect of cold temperature?).
  2. I’ve asked every member company to do the same.
  3. I’ve informed the Fraud Alert representatives of the Department of Energy, the Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agencies that CPBR is violating U.S. Copyright Law and should stop receiving Federal funds (DOE has given them almost $23 million, for example).
  4. I’ve informed CPBR’s internet provider that CPBR is using email to send content that infringes on my copyright.

All of the above could have been avoided if CPBR simply linked to my Designing Conference Posters page.  I love it when people link to my page.  Alternatively, if CPBR wanted to quote a sentence or two, that would be totally fine.  Here are two examples (book, website) of how to use quotation marks and attribution.

“Yet the politics of shipwreck can be avoided, I think, if we can construct a theory of feminist criticism within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive; in that way, its processes can be examined beside, compared with, and contrasted to other branches of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.” [translate]

— Schumacher, D. 1989.  Subjectivities: a theory of the critical process.  Pages 29-36 in Feminist Literary Criticism: Explorations in Theory, edited by Josephine Donovan. University Press of Kentucky.

“CPBR speeds the transfer of plant-related biotechnologies from the research laboratory to the marketplace, expanding economic opportunities through university research and global networking. Its highly competitive project selection process includes … industrial evaluation of research concepts to insure [sic] industrial relevance … ”

— The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. Retrieved 22 March 2014, from http://www.cpbr.org/content.html.

It’s really odd that CPBR didn’t just use quotations and attribution.  The CEO has a PhD in literature, and CPBR’s website has images and quotes that are all nicely attributed. Plus the core mission of the company is to foster commercialization of the intellectual property of participating scientists — and CPBR has IP lawyers on retainer for that very purpose.  There are, in short, so many reasons why this is not a company you’d expect to plagiarize or to infringe on copyrights.

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Sweet potatoes and yams

Some photographs to get you excited about starches on Thanksgiving.  If you’re curious about the difference between yams, sweet potatoes, and potatoes, please refer to my page, “Yams and sweet potatoes are not potatoes.”

colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; yam-display-at-ethnic-grocer
The bin of “#1 American yams” is filled with sweet potatoes. The labeling mistake is a common one. The white yam and yellow yams are actual yams.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; purple-yams
Okinawan sweet potatoes label as yams. They are not yams.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; oriental-sweet-potato
Oriental sweet potatoes. Note that sweet potatoes are not potatoes.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; potatoes
Potatoes are unrelated to sweet potatoes.

 

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Boating to Bartram’s Garden

One of the gems of Philadelphia is the former estate of John Bartram, a world-renowned botanist and buddy of Ben Franklin (who flew his kite there, I gather). Back in the day, his garden along the Schuykill River was filled with rare and interesting plants collected from different regions of the colonies, had a heated greenhouse, and was a destination for anyone of import who happened to be in the area.  The garden and buildings today survive on a small patch of the former property, an island amid urban squalor and decaying industrial sites.  You can drive there, but I took a boat from downtown Philadelphia (visit www.schuylkillbanks.org for details).  In case you are too far away to do the same, some photographs are below (mouseover reveals description; click to see larger).  The most notable part of the house tour was the thriving population of camel crickets on the ceiling.  The tour guide was annoyed that everyone was so interested in them.  Please see my page on them if you’re interested, too.  If you’re in the area and want to go, get details at bartramsgardens.org. The anniversary of his death is this Sunday (September 22nd).

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Boat to Bartram's Gardens on the Schuykill River

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Jet skier on Schuylkill River

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Schuylkill River Trail under construction

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Penn Mediciine construction, seen from Schuylkill River

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Philadelphia prison building, with a view

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Bartram House

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Franklinia in bloom at Bartram House

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Stonework at Bartram House

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Strange staircase at Bartram House

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Camel crickets on ceiling of Bartram House

colin purrington photography: Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia &emdash; Specimens on desk in Bartram House

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