Tag Archives: orange

Open letter to produce managers re: yams

Dear Produce Manager,

If you want to sell more orange-fleshed sweet potatoes, craft your labels with “yams” in parentheses, like this:

Sweet potatoes (“yams”)

Because you are a produce manager, you undoubtedly know that a yam is a completely unrelated thing, so using quotation marks will indicate to ignorant shoppers that you are not actually selling yams. As you also surely know, “yam” is regional slang used by some (generally older folks) to refer to a sweet potato that has orange flesh. But if you only have “yams” on label, some shoppers might get flustered and leave for another store that labels sweet potatoes as “sweet potatoes.” Still others are looking for a specific variety of orange-fleshed sweet potato (Beauregard, Jewel, etc.), so list that, too. E.g.,

‘Beauregard’ sweet potatoes (“yams”)

That’s a lot of text, but different varieties are good for different recipes, and some of your customers are over-educated foodies who care deeply about such details. Ideally, cut one in half and cover in plastic wrap to convince skeptical shoppers that it does, indeed, have orange flesh.

Sincerely,
Colin Purrington

These are sweet potatoes

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Sweet potato flesh can reduce yam confusion

So I have a silly, futile goal of reducing the confusion over sweet potatoes and yams in the United States. If you are a grocery store manager and are on board with this silly, futile goal, please consider displaying the flesh inside the different sweet potato varieties you sell. Doing that will reduce reliance on the strange habit of calling orange-fleshed sweet potatoes “yams.” You can easily show the insides of your sweet potatoes by chopping one in half and wrapping the cut end in plastic wrap, then placing back into the display shelf — you can even use a Sharpie to write stuff on the plastic (I’ve never seen this done … but I’m sure it would work). Or you can make signage that has a photograph of flesh. If you also add some thoughts on how to use them in cooking, even better. Below are two examples of ‘Nancy Hall’ and ‘Beauregard’ sweet potatoes that I cooked over the weekend.

Labels for sweet potatoesNote that the word “yam” does not appear on the sign. If you are the type that says, “What?? You idiot. That sure looks like a yam to me!” … please have look over my “Yams versus sweet potatoes” page. It probably won’t change your opinion, but you’ll at least know what a yam looks like.

On a side note, my ‘Nancy Hall’ sweet potatoes turned out great. I partially cooked them in the oven (coat with bacon fat first) and then sauteed the diced flesh with butter and hickory bark syrup. I used the ‘Beauregard’ to make biscuits. It turns out that biscuits are good with Chessmen cookie butter. Just saying.

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Sweet potatoes and yams

Some photographs to get you excited about starches on Thanksgiving.  If you’re curious about the difference between yams, sweet potatoes, and potatoes, please refer to my page, “Yams and sweet potatoes are not potatoes.”

colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; yam-display-at-ethnic-grocer
The bin of “#1 American yams” is filled with sweet potatoes. The labeling mistake is a common one. The white yam and yellow yams are actual yams.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; purple-yams
Okinawan sweet potatoes label as yams. They are not yams.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; oriental-sweet-potato
Oriental sweet potatoes. Note that sweet potatoes are not potatoes.
colin purrington photography: plants &emdash; potatoes
Potatoes are unrelated to sweet potatoes.

 

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Gratuitous suggestions for car brake lights

I don’t know anyone in the automobile design industry, but just in case someone stumbles onto this post in that position, I have two suggestions that I think would dramatically reduce rear-ending:

1.  Tapping the brakes should activate rear red “braking lights” (as they do now) but the other lights should not be red.  It’s truly stupid to have the running lights (they probably have a better name) the same color as the brake lights.  Application of breaks should “pop” to driver following you, and having “more red” simply doesn’t transmit that information.

2.  Brake lights should blink. Just like those blinking red traffic lights that are going up at  intersections–they really get your attention. I’m sure there are ways to mod your vehicle to display blinking lights, but it should be a basic car design law. It would be extra nice to vary the blink rate with the percentage of braking applied.  E.g, when brakes are fully depressed, the blink rate is super fast to indicate to followers that car is stopping really fast.  But when driver is gently slowing the blink rate is more subdued. I’m sure drivers with epilepsy will have opinions about blink rates to avoid, but in general it would be a good thing, I think. Especially with everyone texting and all.

Blinking brake lights

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