Tag Archives: obesity

Junk food vending machines in public schools

I’m amazed that we are well into 2014 and schools can still sell junk food to students in vending machines. Below are four photographs just in case you haven’t been to school recently.  In first, some breakfast cereals: Frosted Flakes, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks, with 37%, 40%, and 43% sugar, respectively.  I’m sure that the Vending Machine Committee for this school decided that if they avoided Kellogg’s Honey Smacks (55.6% sugar), they could argue that the actual offerings are “healthier options.”  Photographs 2 and 3 show candy and chips.  Photograph 4 is for viewers interested in obesity among minorities.

In Pennsylvania (where photographs were taken), 15.9% of high school students are overweight.  11.8% of adolescents are obese.  With rates that high, many students don’t even need healthier forms of calories — they need to stop snacking.  Vending machines promote snacking.

Colin Purrington Photography: Obesity &emdash; junk-food-vending

Colin Purrington Photography: Obesity &emdash; public-school-vending-machine-radnor

Colin Purrington Photography: Obesity &emdash; junk-food-school-vending-machine

Colin Purrington Photography: Obesity &emdash; public-school-vending-machines

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Sugared beverages and obesity

Like everyone else, I’ve been thoroughly enjoying New York’s recent proposal for banning supersized containers of sugared beverages. Unlikely to pass, but nice to think about how to affect change somehow, since the tax-paying public ends up paying for the medical consequences of other people’s obesity.  Wish we could try to following:

1.  Somehow mandate that sugared sodas cost 25% more than diet options; and that water should be free (OK, you can charge for the cup).

2. Mark the calorie counts on the side of the supersized versions so that people have a visual sense of how many calories are contained. Diet drinks would come with their caloric values, too (zero, at least darn close to zero).

3.  Mandate funny or gross labels like those that are on packages of cigarettes. Writing, “excess calories cause weight gain,” over and over again is clearly a waste of ink and doesn’t seem to reach your average sugar fan. Need something interesting or irreverent.

My quick sketches of #2-3 are below, on a typical large beverage (7-11’s Double Gulp is 64 oz, by the way).  And, yes, I know that sugared drinks vary in calorie content, that hamburgers vary in calorie content, and that not all people find jiggly fat repulsive.

Warning labels for sugared beverages

 

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