Tag Archives: mushroom

Toothed fungus

Toothed fungus emerging from a dead tree in late winter. I really enjoy a tiny fungus that’s just getting started because you can see the small details that are lost in photographs of larger specimens. For this one, it’s all about those yellow-tipped teeth and the translucent, waxy margins. It was growing on a log with hundreds of small, dried brackets so perhaps it’s Steccherinum ochraceum just getting started. But the margins are waxy, not fluffy, so Basidioradulum radula (Schizoporaceae) and Mycoacia fuscoatra (Meruliaceae) might be better ID. Finally, Radulomyces molaris (Pterulaceae) looks similar. And I’m sure there are dozens of other possibilities— there are several million species of fungi.

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Toothed crust fungus in a bark cave

The above illustrates the flip side of photographing cute, immature fungi … they are hard to ID, especially if you don’t know much about fungi. I’ll have to go back in a few weeks to see what it looks like after some warmer weather. Without spores to examine for shape and size it might be hard to decide, so I really need to invest in a microscope. If you have an opinion on the ID, please leave a comment — I’d be grateful for any tips, even if it’s just a recommendation on a guide book for a newbie.

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Toothed crust fungus in a bark cave

In trying to learn more about these species, I was struck by how ignored crust fungi are by mycologists and how they are left out of most field guides. The only interesting thing I could find was an article by Dimitrios Floudas lamenting this obscurity:

“The feeling of collecting these fungi is rewarding, but the frequent lack of people to share this excitement is discouraging.” 

Wise words for many taxa, I think.

Here’s a nice guide if you find yourself with an unidentified crust. You never know when that’s going to happen. 

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Rhizomorphs of honey mushroom (Armillaria)

Some photographs of Armillaria (honey mushroom) underneath the bark of a dead tree. The rhizomorphs look like plant roots but they are filled with hyphae, which sometimes emerge in a more classical mycelial fan. If you find these in your backyard, look for bioluminescence on a cloudy, moonless night. Just give your eyes about 20 minutes to acclimate.

 Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Honey mushroom (Armillaria sp.) rhizomorphs

 Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Honey mushroom (Armillaria sp.) rhizomorphs

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Honey mushroom (Armillaria sp.) rhizomorphs

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Honey mushroom (Armillaria sp.) rhizomorphs

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Stalked puffball-in-aspic (Calostoma cinnabarinum)

Here’s a gooey, mysterious find from my trip to Mohonk Mountain House over Thanksgiving. It took me a while to identify, but I think it’s a stalked puffball-in-aspic (Calostoma cinnabarinum), an ectomycorrhizal boletes that is associated with oak tree roots. It has a number of amusing common names such as hot lips and pretty lips. This one was growing around a pine tree, so perhaps they are flexible about their symbiotic partner. It’s also possible that roots from distant oaks extended to this location (there are some leaves in the frame). But I think the former is more likely, partly because I found a paper (Bautista-Nava and Moreno-Fuentes 2009) that says they grow in pine forests in Mexico. But that paper is in Spanish, which I cannot read, so I could have that wrong.

 Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Stalked puffball-in-aspic (Calostoma cinnabarinum)

After reading they were puffballs, I of course had to hike back to the site to confirm that. Sure enough, filled with spores.

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Stalked puffball-in-aspic (Calostoma cinnabarinum) spores

I’d love to know whether the smaller blobs (most visible in the first photograph) have some supporting function. They apparently are part of the spore case and fall off as the fruiting body matures. But do they also mature into mini puffballs, too? If they don’t, I wonder whether they might act as egg mimics to attract vertebrates (squirrels? raccoons? birds?) that would then step on the larger fruiting bodies, releasing spores. Likely not, but I’m risking the speculation because they look exactly like fish or amphibian eggs, and most guides mention this similarity. In really weak support of this idea, some guide books say it is especially common near streams (where frogs, salamanders, and fish might be common). For those laughing hysterically at me, I would like to mention in my defense that fungi have evolved to mimic termite eggs on several occasions (Matsuura and Yashiro 2010), so it’s not completely without precedent. OK, you can keep laughing now.

Here is a trio of fruiting bodies approximately a foot or so away from the above location. They are in the process of emerging from the soil. The egg-like pieces are still attached underneath, I believe. Would be nice to capture the emergence and maturation on time-lapse.

 Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Stalked puffball-in-aspic (Calostoma cinnabarinum)

If you can share any natural history on this species, I’d love to know more. Please leave a comment or email me.

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Spider with really bad fungal infection

Found this clump of fluff a few days ago and initially wasn’t sure what it was. I’d assumed it was some sort of a gall, but when displayed on a big monitor I could see there were legs sticking out. Pretty sure it’s a spider parasitized by a cordyceps fungus. I’m guessing Torrubiella leiopus. But if I’m wrong about it being a spider underneath, I’ll retract that guess. Sort of looks like Sideshow Bob on The Simpsons.

Colin Purrington Photography: Fungi &emdash; Cordyceps growing out of spider

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