Tag Archives: insects

Moth Night photographs

I’ve been out mothing before (with my dad and his moth friends), but I finally made it to an official National Moth Week event this past Saturday at Natural Lands Trust‘s Hildacy Farm Preserve. It was raining so there wasn’t a great turnout (by the moths), but below are several photographs from the evening.

To set the scene for those of you who haven’t had the experience: we had a flood light, a mercury vapor light, and a blacklight set up next to a couple of white sheets. Any one of them would work just fine, but the more light the better, in general. Even a cell phone screen can attract moths.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; moth-blacklight

The large moth in silhouette above is a Pandora sphinx moth (Eumorpha pandorus). I think the person is entomologist Tanya Dapkey of the University of Pennsylvania. Bigger photo of the moth is below.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; pandora-sphinx-moth

Here’s a copper underwing (Amphipyra pyramidoides), one of two that I found on a tree far away from the lights. E.g., you can go out at night with a flashlight and find moths just hanging out.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; copper-underwing-head

This moth was also just hanging out, avoiding the rain. I think it’s a green arches (Anaplectoides prasina).

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; green-arches-moth

Just in case you want to start planning your own Moth Night, National Moth Week will be July 22-30 in 2017.

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Dangerous red light district for camel crickets

Further refinements to my camel cricket control setup.  Addition of a red “party light” illuminates the whole area so that the motion sensor works much better — no more motion-sensing lights in the system, as per initial design.  Note: most insects don’t see red well, so it’s just dark to them.  Just dab a little food onto the surface of the motion sensor, and they will come.  And then they will go.  Last night I caught approximately 30 crickets.  While I slept.  And upon waking, I could check my iPhone for the update from the WeMo app (I have it say, “Crickets sucked” at each event). Details on how to make your own. Two photographs below were taken by a Belkin Netcam HD automatically, when motion was sensed.  Again, all while I slept.

Camel cricket vacuum

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