Tag Archives: insect

Graphopsocus cruciatus

Here’s a photograph of a narrow barklouse (Graphopsocus cruciatus) with a clutch of eggs. I was initially taking a photograph of the domed structure (more on that below), but then examined the photo on my camera’s LCD viewer and saw this tiny insect moving around. Which surprised me — it was December 18th, and cold. It wasn’t freezing, but certainly not a day I’d expect to find an insect out ovipositing. But apparently this group of insects (Stenopsocidae) are known to be active if there’s a random warm day in winter. I might go back in a few weeks to see what’s become of them.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Narrow barklouse (Graphopsocus cruciatus)

Here’s a closeup of the eggs so you can see the silk that holds them down. I watched her apply this webbing (from labial silk glands) for about 15 minutes. Some species in this group are gregarious and can cover an entire tree in such webbing, which tends to freak out homeowners. I’ve only seen that in Puerto Rico, though. 

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Clutch of narrow barklouse (Graphopsocus cruciatus) eggs

I’m not exactly sure what the egg case is (antmimic spider? ground sac spider?), but I’m wondering whether the barklouse might have positioned her eggs near a potential food source. Barklice are reported to eat fungi, algae, lichens, plant tissue, and pollen, but there doesn’t seem to be much published on the species’ natural history or diet prefereces. I briefly thought the structure might be a slime mold like Enteridium lycoperdon, but then I saw (I think) white embryos or larvae through one of the two holes that seemed roughly chewed through the shell-like exterior. If you recognize the contents, I’d love to hear from you.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Close-up of hole in egg case

Many thanks to Ross Hill (Meford, Oregon) for identification, and to Edward Mockford (University of Illinois) for helpful references on the species.

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Copulating stilt-legged flies

Copulating pair of Taeniaptera trivittata, a type of still-legged fly (Micropezidae). Males (or females, according to one source) apparently brush the eyes of the partner during mating, though this frame didn’t capture that. When flitting around leaves they wave their white-tipped forelegs and look just like small ichneumon wasps. They have thin waists but the pattern on their wings makes them look even thinner, waspier. Known to feed on rotting Typha, which was abundant nearby (John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge, Tinicum, PA).

If you come across a pair, please take a video so I can see the legs in action. I like to watch, and I know of others who are interested in this species.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Copulating stilt-legged flies (Taeniaptera trivittata)

Huge thanks to John S. Ascher and John F. Carr on Bugguide.net for help identifying them.

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Engorged mosquitoes

Some photographs of me donating blood. The first is, I think, an Asian rock pool mosquito (Ochlerotatus japonicus japonicus; formerly known as Aedes japonicus japonicus). The second is an Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus). Introduced to New Jersey in 1998 and Texas in 1985, respectively. Both photographs were taken in Pennsylvania. 

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Asian rock pool mosquito (Ochlerotatus japonicus) with blood meal

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) drinking blood

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Astylopsis macula (Lamiinae)

Found a bunch of these flat-faced longhorn beetles on a dying tree a few weeks ago. I’m fairly confident it’s Astylopsis macula. But there are a gazillion genera of Lamiinae, so I’m happy to be corrected. Would also be very happy to hear from anyone who knows what elytral pits do, other than providing handy identification. I’ve wondered about that for years. Are they vestigial patterns from forewing ancestry? Sound-dampening trick to elude echolocating bats? Are pits just decorations, useful in crypsis or for intraspecific recognition? If you know, would love to hear from you.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Astylopsis macula

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Banded tussock moth

Banded tussock moth (Halysidota tessellaris) caterpillar with stemmata peeking out from behind the anterior tufts. The second photograph shows the barbed setae, which will eventually be detached and rewoven into the cocoon.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Banded tussock moth (Halysidota tessellaris) caterpillar

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Barbed setae of the banded tussock moth (Halysidota tessellaris) caterpillar

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