Tag Archives: dorin schumacher

DMCA NOCI RE CPBR PDF

This post is for people tracking the bizarre ethical slide of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR).

As you probably know from my earlier posts, CPBR sends out a yearly invitation to plant biotechnology researchers to submit grant proposals.  Part of the emailed PDF has instructions on how to make a scientific poster, and a big part of that section was created by copying/pasting text from my page on the topic (but with no quotation marks and no attribution).

Because I happen to have an official copyright registration on my poster design page, the PDF is in violation of U.S. copyright law.  So, in addition to being able to sue CPBR rather easily, I can can also use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to send Notifications of Copyright Infringement (NOCIs) to have the CPBR document (PDF and any paper copies) destroyed.

So here’s what I’ve done.

  1. I’ve asked every member university to delete the PDF when received from CPBR.  In other words, the grants administration office will no longer forward that PDF to faculty on campus.  Because CPBR forbids member institutions from posting the PDF online (don’t ask me why), this means CPBR will not receive grant applications in the future.  Note that asking universities to help protect my copyright is a friendly request — I was not accusing the universities of anything.  It’s just like asking them to help protect copyrighted movies that might be illegally shared by students.  With one exception (University of Minnesota), they are happy to help. The University of Minnesota’s lawyers insist email forwarding of PDFs is exempt from copyright law (lingering effect of cold temperature?).
  2. I’ve asked every member company to do the same.
  3. I’ve informed the Fraud Alert representatives of the Department of Energy, the Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agencies that CPBR is violating U.S. Copyright Law and should stop receiving Federal funds (DOE has given them almost $23 million, for example).
  4. I’ve informed CPBR’s internet provider that CPBR is using email to send content that infringes on my copyright.

All of the above could have been avoided if CPBR simply linked to my Designing Conference Posters page.  I love it when people link to my page.  Alternatively, if CPBR wanted to quote a sentence or two, that would be totally fine.  Here are two examples (book, website) of how to use quotation marks and attribution.

“Yet the politics of shipwreck can be avoided, I think, if we can construct a theory of feminist criticism within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive; in that way, its processes can be examined beside, compared with, and contrasted to other branches of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.” [translate]

— Schumacher, D. 1989.  Subjectivities: a theory of the critical process.  Pages 29-36 in Feminist Literary Criticism: Explorations in Theory, edited by Josephine Donovan. University Press of Kentucky.

“CPBR speeds the transfer of plant-related biotechnologies from the research laboratory to the marketplace, expanding economic opportunities through university research and global networking. Its highly competitive project selection process includes … industrial evaluation of research concepts to insure [sic] industrial relevance … ”

— The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. Retrieved 22 March 2014, from http://www.cpbr.org/content.html.

It’s really odd that CPBR didn’t just use quotations and attribution.  The CEO has a PhD in literature, and CPBR’s website has images and quotes that are all nicely attributed. Plus the core mission of the company is to foster commercialization of the intellectual property of participating scientists — and CPBR has IP lawyers on retainer for that very purpose.  There are, in short, so many reasons why this is not a company you’d expect to plagiarize or to infringe on copyrights.

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Happy anniversary Dr Dorin Schumacher!

Dorin Schumacher with motocycle.
Photograph of Dorin Schumacher from Cambridge Who’s Who. She was Professional of the Year for Non-Profits Management in 2011.

One of the mildly entertaining things about having a blog is seeing what type of web searches lead people to my site.  For me, key search terms usually include “killing camel crickets”.  But “Dr Dorin Schumacher” is up there, too.  The former is a pestiferous creature that dwells in dark places and leaves frass stains everywhere. The latter has a doctorate in French literature, has a fondness for wearing black, and heads a Georgia-based non-profit (The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research) that plagiarizes my site heavily.  When I complained about the plagiarism, she used CPBR’s money (which comes from the DOE, USDA, and EPA … i.e., you) to hire a fancy lawyer to threaten me with copyright infringement.  She has demanded that I take down my site or face hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages.

That was a year ago, and it seems like a fine day to make an anniversary post in her honor, if for no other reason than to solidify my awesome “Dr Dorin Schumacher” Google ranking.

When news of this frass behavior hit the internet last year, there was a lot of interest (albeit brief), even from people who don’t normally care about the design of scientific posters (the content of mine that CPBR had stolen and claimed was theirs).  For example, the story crashed the servers at The Chronicle of Higher Education (that had never happened before, I was told).  A lot of people contacted me with emails of sympathy, but nothing really affected Dr Schumacher’s little hive in St Simon’s Island (a resort town).

So here’s what I did: I spent a fun-filled week contacting Presidents, Grants Administration Chairs, and designated DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) Agents at every single one of CPBR’s member institutions.  I informed them that CPBR’s document infringed on my copyrighted material, attached proof (PDFs, etc.), and asked them to stop emailing the document to their researchers.  Naturally, forwarding material that is known to violate copyright is something universities traditionally avoid.  I also informed the private corporations that they were trafficking a document that violated my copyright. Biotechnology corporations generally like copyright law, too.

One year later: not a single member has complied with my wishes — they are all still members of the CPBR racket (it diverts millions of dollars of taxpayer money that would normally go to USDA, EPA, and DOE grants).  The only encouraging response I got was from a person who said, “we will continue to follow this” (yeah, thanks a lot).  All of them apparently decided that ignoring my request (after all, just some snarky botanist in Swarthmore) would preserve the juicy financial benefits of continued CPBR membership.

And CPBR continues to email the document containing my text to all its member institutions and still has “copyright CPBR” plastered on the pages in question.  In fact, everything seems to be peachy at CPBR in the resort town of St Simon’s Island, Georgia.  They just finished an annual gathering in DC, and even had important government officials (Dr Johnathan Male, Department of Energy; Sanford Bishop, US House of Representatives) and scientists give keynote talks (see program details).  And its funding seems rather secure (according to the DOE’s Dr Male in this PDF).  The Department of Energy has given them $23 million dollars.  Dr Schumacher pays herself $1/4 million per year.

So I thought it would be fun to list the member institutions below as a way to call attention to their inaction.  If you’re an alum who might care to contact them, you’d get 17 karma points. If you want to contact the DOE office that gives CPBR its money, you can email them.

cpbr member institutions

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Psst — plant biotechnology researchers …

Anyone have the latest program announcement from The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research?  The title is “Bioenergy and Biomass Conversion From Plant-Based Research to Prototype Bio-Materials.” I’m hugely curious to know whether they have deleted the appendix on poster design tips.  In case you didn’t know, they are accusing me of stealing their tips … in fact, if I don’t take my page down (Designing conference posters), they plan to bring me to court to sue for damages. If they deleted or completely reworded their appendix, the change would be an admission of copyright infringement guilt.

Hence my curiosity.

So please let me know if you have a copy.  Would also love to chat with anyone who submitted a pre-proposal back in December 2013.  Especially interesting in chatting with those who might have been selected to present a poster in Washington, D.C. in March 2014.  I can give you poster advice if you contact me! Don’t worry, I will not release your name.

If you are curious, below are some pages from their previous Appendix 5, “Symposium Poster Rules and Guidelines.”  If you see highlighting, that’s where the text is taken from my site, which I published years before they crafted their Appendix 5. Yes, that’s right: they copy/pasted, then made minor edits.  And then just claimed it was theirs.

cpbr-plagiarism

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Petition to Dorin Schumacher at CPBR

Thanks for visiting my website. I’d be grateful if you could fill in the form below so that an email is sent to Dr Dorin Schumacher, the CEO of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research.  CPBR copy/pasted some of my copyrighted text … and then served me with legal papers demanding I take my site down, charging me with copyright infringement). The letter is already composed so all you have to do is hit the Send button. But feel free to modify the text if you have the time and feel so moved. If you want to visit any of the links I’ve mentioned, they’re at the bottom of this page. I’d be hugely grateful if you could get the word out to others via Facebook and Twitter…would love to flood their inbox with several thousand petitions. Would. make. my. day.

Petition CPBR to admit to copyright infringement

Dear Dr Schumacher,

[signature]

76 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   

Links mentioned in the petition

Dr Dorin Schumacher, CEO of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, based in the resort town of St Simons Island, Georgia. Photograph from the Cambridge Who’s Who website.
Dr Dorin Schumacher, CEO of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, based in the resort town of St Simons Island, Georgia. Photograph from the Cambridge Who’s Who website.

Evidence of copyright infringement
http://colinpurrington.com/2013/update-on-plagiarism-charge-by-consortium-for-plant-biotechnology-research-inc/

“Designing conference posters”
http://colinpurrington.com/tips/academic/posterdesign

CPBR’s member institutions
http://www.cpbr.org/index.html?membership.html

Beer Donation button
http://colinpurrington.com/about

Colin Purrington’s Amazon wish list
http://colinpurrington.com/2013/consortium-for-plant-biotechnology-research-money-sink

 

 

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Get plagiarized!

Get PlagiarizedIt’s come to my attention that a few science and ethics faculty are featuring my situation when they discuss plagiarism.  So I thought it might be useful if I made a little graphic for them, to use in their Powerpoint shows and such.  The design emulates and pokes fun at the book, Get Funded!, which is authored by Dorin Schumacher, the owner of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research . . . which still refuses to acknowledge that it is plagiarizing my poster design instructions (and threatining to sue me … since I called them on it).

But no, I don’t have plans to write a book on plagiarism.  If you want to know my opinions on the topic, please see my Preventing Plagiarism page.

 

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