Insects from Gambier, Ohio

I spent a few hours over the weekend taking photographs at Kenyon College’s Brown Family Environmental Center in Gambier, Ohio. It was fun to be back in the area — I spent a good chunk of my childhood in Granville, Ohio, about 45 minutes away.

1. Robber fly (Asilidae; probably Dioctria hyalipennis). I watched it for awhile but didn’t see it take prey. Menacing little guy. Love the forked antennae.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Robber fly (Dioctria hyalipennis)

2. Small flies on a milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) flower. It was quite the hangout.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Small flies on milkweed flower

3. Milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca), with a monarch butterfly caterpillar (it’s there). It was the only monarch I could find in the whole field. It didn’t seem to be eating, and I for the life of me I couldn’t find any evidence that it had been eating anywhere on the two milkweeds in the frame. Odd.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Milkweed with monarch caterpillar

4. Helmeted squash bug (Euthochtha galeator), I think, on a milkweed leaf. This is a nymph, of course — adults grow up to look completely different.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Helmeted squash bug (Euthochtha galeator) nymph

5. Wooly aphid caught on a spider web. These were flying all around, so it was nice to have one that was relatively stationary because I didn’t have a tripod with me.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Wooly aphid stuck on spider web

6. Goldenrod gall caused by the midge, Rhopalomyia solidaginis (diptera).

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Goldenrod gall midge (Rhopalomyia solidaginis)

7. Goldenrod gall (with Eurosta solidaginus):

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Goldenrod gall (with Eurosta solidaginus)

8. Grape filbert gall (Schizomyia coryloides) growing on a grape vine (Vitis sp.). The namers of this species thought the gall looked like clusters of filberts (hazelnuts). I found a photograph of filbert fruit if you are curious, like I was. Coryloides is apparently a genus of extinct filbert, by the way. I’ve never seen one of these galls before, so this was a real treat.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; Grape filbert gall (schizomyia coryloides)

About Colin Purrington

PhD in evolutionary biology • twitterinstagram
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