Category Archives: Food

Vaccinating kids against sugary drink addiction

It’s sometimes hard to notice against the backdrop of large and extra-large adults, but 1 out of 3 kids these days is overweight or obese, too. Consuming drinks that have sugar, which kids really, really love, is a big part of why, especially because some parents think such drinks are healthy. So I got to wondering what public schools are actually doing to educate kids about the calorie content of beverages. Or, for kids too young to really grasp the calorie concept, how do schools inform kids that drinking too many sugary drinks can make them fat (if, indeed, teachers are allowed to suggest that being fat might be unhealthy)? Given that obesity is the most pressing medical issue facing kids, I would think that public schools would be totally focused on these topics, and would acknowledge that early intervention is better.

Below is the class activity I think all kindergartners should be doing: making a poster showing how much sugar is in common beverages. It’s a common science fair project, but if done in early elementary school the experience might vaccinate them against over-consumption of sugary drinks.

Sugar in drinksThere are lots of ways to do it, but what I like about the one above is that water and plain milk are included. There should also be some common juices (apple, orange, e.g.), of course, because they are loaded with sugar. And just for scale, it might be good to show how many teaspoons of sugar are in a typical bag of candy (e.g., Skittles).

I would further suggest that the poster include a bag of sugar to represent the total number of calories needed for a typical kindergartner (maybe 1 1/2 cups; 1200 calories?). Teachers should clarify, of course, that eating 1 1/2 cups of sugar is not the way kids should meet their daily energy needs. When done, the poster can go out in the hallway to horrify the rest of the school.

Finally, don’t give your poster a weak title like, “Rethink your drink.” Although we know what that means (and it rhymes), try instead to craft something with a more direct message, like, “Don’t drink dessert all day”, “Don’t drink your dessert”, “Sugary drinks are candy drinks”, “Liquid candy can make you fat.” The idea is to be direct, memorable. And to not shy away from the point: sugary drinks can (do!) make kids fat.

I’m making a Pinterest board to collect some good examples, so if you are a public school teacher, please have a look:

Pinterest board Educating kindergartners about sugary drinks on Pinterest.

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Catless in Seattle?

Meowtroplitan Via Purringtons Cat Lounge (Portland), here’s a link for cat fans in Seattle: Meowtropolitan’s indiegogo campaign. If you don’t have a cat in Seattle, it would be a great place to go to find one. Plus you can drink coffee, which is always a plus. Probably will be a Bring Your Own Laser Pointer kind of a place. So if that all sounds good, support the campaign.

I don’t live in Seattle, but I feel obliged to give them a shout out because my last name is Purrington and I like cats and coffee. Good luck!

Mockup of cat space

 

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Open letter to produce managers re: yams

Dear Produce Manager,

If you want to sell more orange-fleshed sweet potatoes, craft your labels with “yams” in parentheses, like this:

Sweet potatoes (“yams”)

Because you are a produce manager, you undoubtedly know that a yam is a completely unrelated thing, so using quotation marks will indicate to ignorant shoppers that you are not actually selling yams. As you also surely know, “yam” is regional slang used by some (generally older folks) to refer to a sweet potato that has orange flesh. But if you only have “yams” on label, some shoppers might get flustered and leave for another store that labels sweet potatoes as “sweet potatoes.” Still others are looking for a specific variety of orange-fleshed sweet potato (Beauregard, Jewel, etc.), so list that, too. E.g.,

‘Beauregard’ sweet potatoes (“yams”)

That’s a lot of text, but different varieties are good for different recipes, and some of your customers are over-educated foodies who care deeply about such details. Ideally, cut one in half and cover in plastic wrap to convince skeptical shoppers that it does, indeed, have orange flesh.

Sincerely,
Colin Purrington

These are sweet potatoes

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