Moth Night photographs

I’ve been out mothing before (with my dad and his moth friends), but I finally made it to an official National Moth Week event this past Saturday at Natural Lands Trust‘s Hildacy Farm Preserve. It was raining so there wasn’t a great turnout (by the moths), but below are several photographs from the evening.

To set the scene for those of you who haven’t had the experience: we had a flood light, a mercury vapor light, and a blacklight set up next to a couple of white sheets. Any one of them would work just fine, but the more light the better, in general. Even a cell phone screen can attract moths.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; moth-blacklight

The large moth in silhouette above is a Pandora sphinx moth (Eumorpha pandorus). I think the person is entomologist Tanya Dapkey of the University of Pennsylvania. Bigger photo of the moth is below.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; pandora-sphinx-moth

Here’s a copper underwing (Amphipyra pyramidoides), one of two that I found on a tree far away from the lights. E.g., you can go out at night with a flashlight and find moths just hanging out.

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; copper-underwing-head

This moth was also just hanging out, avoiding the rain. I think it’s a spotted Phosphila (Phosphila miselioides).

Colin Purrington Photography: Insects &emdash; green-arches-moth

Just in case you want to start planning your own Moth Night, National Moth Week will be July 22-30 in 2017.

About Colin Purrington

PhD in evolutionary biology • twitterinstagram
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One Response to Moth Night photographs

  1. Peter says:

    Hi Colin,

    Great tips for night photography- I like how you reccomended using cell phone if you come unprepared.

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